Physics II workshop_Part_70

Physics II workshop_Part_70 - Straight line graphs on...

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142 Straight line graphs on linear graph paper. Suppose that we have plotted a graph with Y on the ordinate and X on the abscissa and the result is a straight line. We know that the general equation for a straight line is Y = M X + B where M is the slope and B is the intercept on the Y-axis (or Y-intercept ). The capital forms of Y and X are chosen to represent any arbitrary variables we choose to plot. For example we may choose to plot position, x, on the Y-axis versus mass, m, on the X-axis, so we need different symbols for our general case. Refer to Figure 4 to see what is being done. We choose two points, (X 1 ,Y 1 ) and (X 2 ,Y 2 ), from the straight line that are not data points and that lie near opposite ends of the line so that a precise slope can be calculated. (Y 2 -Y 1 ) is called the rise of the line, while (X 2 -X 1 ) is the run . The slope is Eq. 1 Slope has units and these must be included in your answer! The point where the line crosses the vertical axis is called the
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This note was uploaded on 11/26/2011 for the course PHY 2053 taught by Professor Lind during the Fall '09 term at FSU.

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Physics II workshop_Part_70 - Straight line graphs on...

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