Intro to Analysis in-class_Part_9

Intro to Analysis in-class_Part_9 - 1.3 The rational...

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Unformatted text preview: 1.3 The rational numbers 23 3. x G, ! y G such that x + y = y + x = 0. Write y =- x . Written multiplicatively, ( G, , 1) must satisfy 1. x,y G = x y is a well-defined element of G . 2. !1 such that x y = y x = x, x G . 3. x G, ! y G such that x y = y x = 1. Write y = 1 x . Theorem 1.3.2. Z , Q , R , C are groups under addition. N , N are not. Theorem 1.3.3. Let Q = { x Q . . . x 6 = 0 } . Then Q is a group under multiplication. So are R and C . Z is not. Definition 1.3.4. A set which is a group under addition, and whose nonzero elements form a group under multiplication is called a field if the two operations behave nicely together: a ( b + c ) = ( a b ) + ( a c ) (Distributive law) and the operations + , are commutative. Theorem 1.3.5. Q , R , C are fields. GL n = { invertible n n matrices } is not....
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Intro to Analysis in-class_Part_9 - 1.3 The rational...

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