Thermodynamics filled in class notes_Part_45

Thermodynamics filled in class notes_Part_45 - 3.4...

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Unformatted text preview: 3.4. GAS-VAPOR MIXTURES 97 Now for the absolute humidity (or specific humidity), one has ω = 0 . 622 P v P a , (3.280) = 0 . 622 2 . 3675 kPa 97 . 62 kPa , (3.281) = . 0152 kg H 2 O kg dry air . (3.282) Now for the masses of air and water, one can use the partial pressures: m a = P a V RT M a , (3.283) = P a V R a T , (3.284) = (97 . 62 kPa ) ( 75 m 3 ) parenleftBig 8 . 314 kJ kmole K 28 . 97 kg kmole parenrightBig (298 K ) , (3.285) = 85 . 61 kg. (3.286) m v = P v V RT M v , (3.287) = P v V R v T , (3.288) = (2 . 3675 kPa ) ( 75 m 3 ) parenleftBig 8 . 314 kJ kmole K 18 . 015 kg kmole parenrightBig (298 K ) , (3.289) = 1 . 3 kg. (3.290) Also one could get m v from m v = ωm a , (3.291) = (0 . 0152)(85 . 61 kg ) , (3.292) = 1 . 3 kg. (3.293) Now the dew point is the saturation temperature at the partial pressure of the water vapor. With P v = 2 . 3675 kPa , the saturation tables give T dew point = 20 . 08 ◦ C. (3.294) 3.4.1 First law The first law can be applied to air-water mixtures.The first law can be applied to air-water mixtures....
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Thermodynamics filled in class notes_Part_45 - 3.4...

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