Thermodynamics filled in class notes_Part_46

Thermodynamics - 3.4 GAS-VAPOR MIXTURES 99 Now the absolute humidity(humidity ratio is ω 2 = 622 P v 2 P 2 − P v 2(3.313 = 622 1 620 kPa 100 kPa

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Unformatted text preview: 3.4. GAS-VAPOR MIXTURES 99 Now the absolute humidity (humidity ratio) is ω 2 = . 622 P v 2 P 2 − P v 2 , (3.313) = . 622 1 . 620 kPa 100 kPa − 1 . 620 kPa , (3.314) = . 0102 . (3.315) Then, substituting, one gets ˙ Q cv ˙ m a = parenleftbigg 1 . 004 kJ kg K parenrightbigg (15 ◦ C − 30 ◦ C ) − . 0208 parenleftbigg 2556 . 3 kJ kg parenrightbigg +0 . 0102 parenleftbigg 2528 . 9 kJ kg parenrightbigg + (0 . 0208 − . 0102) parenleftbigg 62 . 99 kJ kg parenrightbigg , (3.316) = − 41 . 77 kJ kg dry air . (3.317) 3.4.2 Adiabatic saturation In an adiabatic saturation process, an air-vapor mixture contacts a body of water in a well insulated duct. If the initial humidity of the mixture is less than 100%, some water will evaporate and join the mixture. If the mixture leaving the duct is saturated, and the process is adiabatic, the exit temper- ature is the adiabatic saturation temperature. Assume the liquid water entering the system enters at the exit temperature of the mixture.enters at the exit temperature of the mixture....
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This note was uploaded on 11/26/2011 for the course EGN 3381 taught by Professor Park-sou during the Fall '11 term at FSU.

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Thermodynamics - 3.4 GAS-VAPOR MIXTURES 99 Now the absolute humidity(humidity ratio is ω 2 = 622 P v 2 P 2 − P v 2(3.313 = 622 1 620 kPa 100 kPa

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