An important strand within contemporary criminological theory combines

An important strand within contemporary criminological theory combines

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An important strand within contemporary criminological theory combines psychological and sociological approaches in social learning theory. This model is based upon the basic discovery that behavior is often patterned after the observed habits of others. As individuals we observe when others are successful or unsuccessful in meeting their needs and desires. We tend to copy the modeled successful strategies while ignoring the poor choices. As long as our role models are individuals who follow acceptable means of achieving their goals, social learning works to implant positive behavior. However, there are several circumstances that can lead to negative outcomes. Some children are raised in families in which violence is used as a means to achieve desires. Abusive parents model to their children that violent behavior is acceptable. Boys see that males are expected to act aggressively, while girls learn that to be the victim of directed violence is the norm. Similarly, during the teen years youth often substitute peers for parents as their primary role models. As adolescent masculinity is often expressed in action rather than cerebral activities (thus bright boys are labeled as “geeks” and “nerds”), boys often act out and find themselves rewarded by other males and by responses from adolescent girls. As adults, males are expected to channel their aggressive behavior into socially accepted outlets such as work and career, and weekend sports activities. A variation of the social learning model focuses on media depictions serving as role models or teachers rather than real persons. Considerable debate surrounds this topic, and efforts to control media violence continue. One area that has been much discussed is copycat crimes.
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Copycat Crimes Does reading about crimes in the newspaper or viewing criminal activity on television news or in Hollywood films produce more crime? Does media exposure of crime inspire copycats? Frequently cited examples
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This note was uploaded on 11/27/2011 for the course CCJ 5606 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at FSU.

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An important strand within contemporary criminological theory combines

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