Comm-HumanDev

Comm-HumanDev - Human Resources Development Human Resources...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Human Resources Development Human Resources Development is a response to the tendency in the United States to invest more in income support (welfare) than human skills development… although this changed in the mid-1990s. The overarching goals of human resources development are: 1) Training and education (training) 2) Job placement (placing workers) 3) Client-oriented job creation (creating jobs for certain skills) 4) Job maintenance (keeping existing jobs that are a “good fit”) Unlike the other approaches that are geography-based (locality and community development) or business-based (business development), this approach is grounded in developing the skills and capabilities of individuals; it is a people-based approach . It is often overlooked that people are the greatest resource in a community. While businesses, location, and local institutions all play a role in local economic development, it is usually the local citizens that make or break local economic development efforts. Human resources development is aimed at providing the skills, knowledge, and preparation for a group of people so that they are better able to respond to opportunities.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Human Development: Approaches Blakely discusses several different approaches to “Human Resource Development”. These include: -Workforce Investment Boards -First-Source Agreements -Employment Maintenance -Skill Banks -Training Programs -Self-Employment Initiatives -Job ladders -University-Industry Technology Transfer 1) What is each of the above approaches? 2) What individuals are the focus of each approach? 3) How is each approach expected to contribute to local economic development? 4) What is the role of the local government in each approach? 5) Examples?
Background image of page 2
The Baltimore Context postmodern economy where other cities (Buffalo, Detroit, Cleveland, etc.) have failed. Imbroscio et al argue that this is not true. What are the major problems that Baltimore continues to face? --Shift from industrial/manufacturing to a service economy --“Secession of the successful” --Government downsizing --Strong government unions --No allies at the state level as the only major city in the state
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 11

Comm-HumanDev - Human Resources Development Human Resources...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online