Pushing the Native Americans Aside

Pushing the Native - Legion of the United States vs a confederacy of Indian tribes Indians received no support from their former British allies

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Pushing the Native Americans Aside Carlos Pantin Pgs 204-205
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Setting the Scene - British In 1796 the last British Solider departed from Canada. Before that, the British persisted on convincing the Native Americans to attack American “invaders” of their land. This encouragement led to several impressive Native American victories in the
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Setting the Scene - Indians Even before the British encouraged resistance, the Indians had fiercely defended themselves of American expansion. For example: 1790: Gen. Josiah Harmar led his soldiers into an ambush. 1791: Gen. Arthur St. Clair suffered more than 900 casualties in a confrontation near the Wabash River.
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Battle of Fallen Timbers However, the Indians then confronted a true US Army General… General Anthony Wayne. “Mad Anthony” The Battle of Fallen Timbers, August 20, 1794 Maumee, Ohio (aka “last battle of the American Revolution”)
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Unformatted text preview: Legion of the United States vs. a confederacy of Indian tribes Indians received no support from their former British allies. Setting the Scene - Spanish Spanish officials in 1795 encouraged the U.S representative in Madrid to discuss navigation in the Mississippi River. This river was closed to Americans and Spanish encouraged Natives near this area to harass any trespasser. After Jay’s Treaty, the Spanish wrongly assumed that the British and U.S had formed an alliance to drive Spain out of North America The Consequence: Pinckney's Treaty October 27, 1795. Thomas Pinckney form South Carolina. The Spanish decided to offer extraordinary concessions: 1-The opening of the Mississippi 2-Right to deposit goods in New Orleans without paying duties 3-A secure southern boundary on the 31st Parallel 4-A promise to stay out of Indian Affairs....
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This note was uploaded on 11/27/2011 for the course HISTORY 103 taught by Professor Livingston during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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Pushing the Native - Legion of the United States vs a confederacy of Indian tribes Indians received no support from their former British allies

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