Wilson's foreign policy

Wilson's foreign policy - RealismvIdealism...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Realism v Idealism Realism – a foreign-policy perspective  where a country pursues relations with  other countries only out of self interest Idealism – A foreign-policy perspective  where a country’s foreign policy is  guided by ideology
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Woodrow Wilson President Wilson strongly believed in self- determination – the right of a people to chose their own government Yet he intervened in the affairs of other countries more than any previous President. Upholding the Roosevelt corollary, he sent troops into Haiti in 1915, the Dominican Republic in 1916, and Cuba in 1917.
Background image of page 2
Mexico Wilson hesitated to intervene directly in a Mexican Revolution, which was already underway when he took office. He personally detested the leader of a bloody coup, Victoriano Huerta, and refused to recognize his government. Two events led Wilson to occupy the port city of Veracruz: a dispute over American honor at Tampico and a rumored shipment of German arms en route to Huerta.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Mexico Outrage over occupation of Veracruz, both at home and
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 12

Wilson's foreign policy - RealismvIdealism...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online