0426s05sol_therm - Solar Thermal Technology Edward C. Kern,...

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Solar Thermal Technology Edward C. Kern, Jr. with additions by Jeff Tester Sustainable Energy 10.391J, etc.
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4/26/2005 2 Solar Thermal Resource characteristics High temperature for electric power generation Medium temperature for water heating and comfort) heating (human comfort) Heat for industrial processes “active” building solar heating (human Low temperature “passive” building solar
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4/26/2005 3
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4/26/2005 4 Solar thermal using concentrators Focusing requires direct, non-diffuse component Storage or hybridization needed to be dispatchable Distributed mid size capacity -- parabolic troughs 1 -10 MWe Distributed smaller scale 10 kW -1 MWe dishes Medium temperature for water heating and “active” building solar heating/cooling of buildings (HVAC) Industrial process heat Central station option -- power towers 10 – 100 MWe -- Low temperature “passive” building solar heating
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4/26/2005 5 Power tower with molten salt storage Power Tower or Central Receiver Cold Salt Hot Salt EPGS 288°C 565°C Energy collection decoupled from power production Heliostat Conventional Steam Generator Courtesy of U.S. DOE.
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4/26/2005 6 Power Towers Courtesy of U.S. DOE.
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4/26/2005 7 Heliostat Fields Current heliostat prices $125 to $159 m -2 ± Reduction potential from manufacturing scale-up ± Innovative Designs Compare with trough and PV Courtesy of SunLab (Sandia National Laboratories and NREL partnership).
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4/26/2005 8 Parabolic Troughs Developed by Luz for use in ± Slowed thinking about large scale PV Dispatchable hybrid design storage Participated commercially in 1980s CA green power markets 354 Megawatts installed by still operating today California in 1970s with natural gas backup – no 1991 at Kramer Junction, CA Courtesy of NREL.
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4/26/2005 9 Luz International Failed commercially in 1992 from: ± Low natural gas and ± High maintenance cost ± Lack of certainty about tax incentives Restructured company still in operation at Kramer Junction ± Along the learning curve on O+M innovations, e.g.
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0426s05sol_therm - Solar Thermal Technology Edward C. Kern,...

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