{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Searle - Searles Bar Abstract This experiment examined the...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Searle’s Bar. Abstract: This experiment examined the thermal conductivity of the metal, Copper. The experiment was carried out twice, with the mass flow rate of water being increased for the second trial and the thermal conductivity was determined for each flow rate using the two equations that will be detailed later in this report. Results showed that the thermal conductivity was lower using both equations when the mass flow rate of water was increased. Introduction. The basis of this experiment is to determine the thermal conductivity of a copper sample. Copper is regarded as a good conductor so the Searle’s Bar method was used. If we were looking at a poor conductor, another method, such as the Lee’s Disc method may be used. The SI units of thermal conductivity are W/mK but we are using W/m ° C as this is also a viable unit. We know that there will be no alterations to the relative positions of the molecular particles in the sample so therefore we know that conduction is taking place, as opposed to the other two main processes of heat transfer, convection and radiation. For results to be obtained, we will need to find out the temperature differences between the thermometers that are positioned at either end of the material, i.e. Copper, and at either end of the cooling coil. We will be examining how the characteristics of the material affect the transfer of heat through the sample and also how this may affect it use in different aspects of the construction world. From these results, we may then be able to analyse how we can maximise the materials properties to the benefit of building projects. Barry Heffron Student No. 10401006 Session B2 Group 8 1
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Equation 1 At equilibrium: Rate of heat flow along bar = Rate of heat extraction due to cooling; therefore ( 29 ( 29 1 2 4 3 Θ - Θ Θ - Θ = A Mxlxc k = W/m ° C Where: K = Thermal conductivity (W/ m ° C) A = Cross sectional area of bar (m 2 ) 4 1 Θ Θ to = Readings from thermometers ( ° C) l = Spacing of thermometers along bar (m) M = Mass flow rate (Kg/s) C = Specific heat capacity of water (4186.8 J/kg ° C) Equation 2 At equilibrium Rate of heat flow along bar = Rate of electrical input ( 29 1 2 Θ - Θ = A VxIxl k = W/m ° C Where: K = Thermal conductivity (W/ m ° C) A = Cross sectional area of bar (m 2 ) 2 1 Θ Θ to = Readings from thermometers ( ° C) l = Spacing of thermometers along bar (m) V = Volts I = Amps Barry Heffron Student No. 10401006 Session B2 Group 8 2
Image of page 2
Apparatus.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern