diffrac_handout1 - X-Rays and Matter In a diffraction...

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Unformatted text preview: X-Rays and Matter In a diffraction experiment, the X-ray beam interacts with the crystal, giving rise to the diffraction pattern. A crystal is a three-dimensional periodic discontinuum, which can be understood as a lattice. The X- ray beam is a monochromatic electromagnetic wave. X-Rays Generating X-Rays Fast electrons X-rays Metal ( e.g. Mo or Cu) Mo K L M N Please see: Massa, Werner. Crystal Structure Determination. 2nd ed. Translated into English by R. O. Gould. New York, NY: Springer, 2004, pp.14. ISBN: 3540206442. O Fast electron Removed due to copyright restrictions. Please see: Massa, Werner. Crystal Structure Determination. 2nd ed. Translated into English by R. O. Gould. New York, NY: Springer, 2004, pp.13. ISBN: 3540206442. Removed due to copyright restrictions. Fig. 3.1 Fig. 3.2 X-Rays and Matter What happens when a beam of monochromatic electromagnetic waves hits a lattice? One dimensional case: shine light through a optical grid of parallel lines: Constructive interference happens only at certain angles, depending on wavelength and lattice constant (spacing between the grid lines)....
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diffrac_handout1 - X-Rays and Matter In a diffraction...

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