WeddingAndWeight

WeddingAndWeight - Langford 1 Lisa Langford 993085569 NPB...

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Lisa Langford 993085569 NPB 132 I Do… Not Know What Happened To My Weight After the Wedding Introduction: Getting married is a life altering event that has now been shown to alter even the weight of the newlyweds. It is unclear whether the event of getting married, the changes in lifestyle, or the influence of the spouse causes the weight gain. Christakis et al. believe that the spousal influence can cause the weight gain. This study is on the influences of social relationships. For example, if one of the spouses was obese, the other was “37% more likely (95% CI, 7 to 73) to become obese” (Christakis et al., 2007, pg. 376). They also showed that wives and husbands affect each other equally. Therefore, the weight of ones spouse can influence one’s own eventual weight. Umberson et al. also give some possible explanations for this weight gain. Their theory is based off of changes after marriage, such as the influence of one spouse on another or the socioeconomic changes [9]. Therefore, the reasons behind this increase in weight are unclear, but it is clear that a weight gain does exist. Many studies focus only on the weight change in females, but some have studied both sexes and found significance in only female weight change after marriage. For example, Table 1 below is taken from a study by Kahn et al. and is a study on weight changes after marriage. This study focused only on women, and after adjusting for weight and height, women were shown to gain 2.3 Kg after marriage [6]. Similarly, Sobal et al. claim that females show a gain in weight after marriage, but a statistically Langford 1
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significant gain in males is not present [7]. These studies portray a definite increase in weight for females after marriage. At the same time, other studies have found an increase in weight for both sexes after marriage. For instance, Hanson et al. claims “married men remained more likely to be overweight than never-married men (19.2 percentage points, P<0.01)” (Hanson et al., 2007, pg 1462). This trend portrays an increase in body weight for males after marriage. This is consistent with the findings of Sobal et al., who has also found a statistically significant increase in weight for men after marriage [7]. The increase in male weight post marriage is studied less and contains more controversial data than that for women, but based off of these studies, it does in fact exist. Fortunately, other studies have found that there is hope for these newly married couples. Studies by Burke et al. show that by putting newly married couples together in a program that teaches about nutrition and a healthy lifestyle, they will make healthier choices. This study suggests that the couple is already adapting to a changing lifestyle, Langford 2
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and by adding this program to the already present change, they can integrate their knowledge and make healthier decisions together [2]. Other studies such as that by Gorin et al. portray what is known as a ripple effect. This means that when only one spouse is
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WeddingAndWeight - Langford 1 Lisa Langford 993085569 NPB...

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