BSN_ch01 - Chapter 1 Introduction To Networking with...

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1 Chapter 1 Introduction To Networking f you’re not familiar with networking, read this chapter to learn the basics of a small network. It outlines what you can use the network to do, introduces you to the hardware and software needed for a network, and explains how a small network is different from larger networks and the Internet. If you’re already familiar with this basic networking information, you can go directly to the end of the chapter to see how to use this book to help you set up your network. What is a Network? A computer network is simply two or more computers connected together so they can exchange information. A small network can be as simple as two computers linked together by a single cable. Figure 1.1 Two Networked Computers I
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2 Building a Simple Network Most networks use hubs to connect computers together. A large network may connect thousands of computers and other devices together. Hub Figure 1.2 Computers Networked With a Hub A wireless network connects computers without a hub or network cables. Computers use radio communications to send data between each other. Figure 1.3 Wireless Network What Can I do With a Simple Network? Without a network, you can access resources only on your own computer. These resources may be devices in your computer, such as a folder or disk
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Chapter 1: Introduction to Networking 3 drive, or they may be connected to your computer, such as a printer or CD- ROM drive. These devices, accessible only to you, are local resources. Networking allows you to share resources among a group of computer users. Figure 1.4 Some Resources You Can Share on a Network Sharing Files and Drives If your computers are connected to a network, each computer can make its resources available to other computers in your office by sharing them over the network. Instead of working in isolation as you do on a single computer not linked to a network, you can work collectively, within a system that shares resources among a group of computer users. Each computer on your network can share folders, entire disk drives, or a CD-ROM drive. Then other computers on your network can access documents and other files stored in the folders and on the drives. Instead of copying a document to a diskette and giving it to another person to view, anyone can open and view the document using the network. If you want to view the company’s annual report stored on a co-worker’s computer, you can use the network to access the document on that computer. If you want to listen to music stored on a computer in another room, you can use the network to access the music files. Sharing a Printer If you have a printer connected to your computer, you can share the printer with other computers on the network. Then instead of buying a printer for every computer, all the computers can print across the network to the printer. Suppose you want to print a document on a color laser printer that is
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BSN_ch01 - Chapter 1 Introduction To Networking with...

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