Hysterectomy - Running head: LAPAROSCOPIC HYSTERECTOMY 1...

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Running head: LAPAROSCOPIC HYSTERECTOMY 1 Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Melanie Brownfield ST 210 September 27, 2011 M. Hill
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LAPAROSCOPIC HYSTERECTOMY 2 Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Hysterectomy, surgical removal of the uterus (womb), is one of the most commonly performed procedures in the United States. According to the American Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologist, more than 650,000 women nationwide undergo hysterectomy for abnormal uterine bleeding, fibroids, which are benign uterine tumors, chronic pelvic inflammatory disease, endometriosis, and uterine or ovarian cancer. This results in the inability to become pregnant. Women can have a hysterectomy if their uterus is causing health problems that cannot be treated by other means. Women should be encouraged to explore all their options before having a hysterectomy. Laparoscopy was pioneered by gynecologists in the early 1960s, and has been widely used in a range of procedures, including tubal ligation, the removal of ovaries and fibroids and the treatment of tubal pregnancies. Laparoscopy is also used for gallbladder removal, appendectomy, hernia repair, and lung and bowel surgery. In one of the newest applications, also developed by our group, it is being used to repair the bladder to treat urinary stress incontinence. Laparoscopic hysterectomy requires more skill than abdominal hysterectomy because the surgeon is operating through a camera. Technically, it is a more difficult procedure. Patients should choose a surgeon who is experienced in working with lasers and laparoscopy, and should be presented all of the available medical options for relief of their pain and/or bleeding, in addition to surgical alternatives. This type of surgery can be performed several different ways, including partial or subtotal hysterectomy, which is the removal of the uterus, without removing the cervix. Total, complete, or simple hysterectomy describes the removal of the uterus and cervix, which is the opening of the uterus leading to the vagina. Radical hysterectomy is the most invasive and includes the
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LAPAROSCOPIC HYSTERECTOMY 3 removal of the uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, upper part of the vagina, and the pelvic lymph nodes. A salpingo-oophorectomy, removal of the ovaries and fallopian tubes, may be combined with any of the above procedures. Abdominal hysterectomy typically requires women to spend four to six days in the hospital and four to six weeks recuperating at home. Laparoscopic hysterectomy is performed as an outpatient surgery, which means most patients can go home the same day. As with all types of surgery, there will always be complications. A good surgeon will review
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This note was uploaded on 11/27/2011 for the course HUM 120 taught by Professor Lisa during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Hysterectomy - Running head: LAPAROSCOPIC HYSTERECTOMY 1...

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