RSCH 2501 Week 10 - Test Form B - Bakris & Dickholtz, 2007 Atlas Adjusting & Hypertension

RSCH 2501 Week 10 - Test Form B - Bakris & Dickholtz, 2007 Atlas Adjusting & Hypertension

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Atlas vertebra realignment and achievement of arterial pressure goal in hypertensive patients: a pilot study G Bakris 1 , M Dickholtz Sr 2 , PM Meyer 1 , G Kravitz 1 , E Avery 1 , M Miller 3 , J Brown 3 , C Woodfield 4 and B Bell 3 1 Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush University Hypertension Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 2 Chiropractic Health Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 3 Barrington Family Medical Clinic, Barrington, IL, USA and 4 Atlas Research Foundation, Barrington, IL, USA Anatomical abnormalities of the cervical spine at the level of the Atlas vertebra are associated with relative ischaemia of the brainstem circulation and increased blood pressure (BP). Manual correction of this mal- alignment has been associated with reduced arterial pressure. This pilot study tests the hypothesis that correcting mal-alignment of the Atlas vertebra reduces and maintains a lower BP. Using a double blind, placebo- controlled design at a single center, 50 drug na ı¨ ve ( n ¼ 26) or washed out ( n ¼ 24) patients with Stage 1 hypertension were randomized to receive a National Upper Cervical Chiropractic (NUCCA) procedure or a sham procedure. Patients received no antihypertensive meds during the 8-week study duration. The primary end point was changed in systolic and diastolic BP compar- ing baseline and week 8, with a 90% power to detect an 8/5mm Hg difference at week 8 over the placebo group. The study cohort had a mean age 52.7 7 9.6 years, consisted of 70% males. At week 8, there were differences in systolic BP ( ÿ 17 7 9mm Hg, NUCCA versus ÿ 3 7 11mm Hg, placebo; P o 0.0001) and diastolic BP ( ÿ 10 7 11mm Hg, NUCCA versus ÿ 2 7 7mm Hg; P ¼ 0.002). Lateral displacement of Atlas vertebra (1.0, baseline versus 0.04 1 week 8, NUCCA versus 0.6, baseline versus 0.5 1 , placebo; P ¼ 0.002). Heart rate was not reduced in the NUCCA group ( ÿ 0.3 beats per minute, NUCCA, versus 0.5 beats per minute, placebo). No adverse effects were recorded. We conclude that restoration of Atlas alignment is associated with marked and sustained reductions in BP similar to the use of two-drug combination therapy. Journal of Human Hypertension advance online publication, 2 March 2007; doi:10.1038/sj.jhh.1002133 Keywords: atlas; vertebra; antihypertensive therapy Introduction It is well known that achievement of blood pressure (BP) goals in more than 70% of hypertensive individuals requires two or more antihypertensive agents. 1 Based on the most recent NHANES 1999– 2000 data, BP control in the US has not improved significantly. 2 Moreover, many people have searched for alternative methods for lowering arterial pressure. Since the early 1940s, a small cadre of chiropractic spets have foregone typical ‘full-spine manip- ulations’, limiting their practice to precise, delicate manual alignment of a single vertebra, C-1 or Atlas; these practitioners make up the National Upper- Cervical Chiropractic Association (NUCCA). Unlike other vertebrae, which interlock one to the next, the...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course RSCH 2501 taught by Professor Brents.russell during the Winter '11 term at Life Chiropractic College West.

Page1 / 6

RSCH 2501 Week 10 - Test Form B - Bakris & Dickholtz, 2007 Atlas Adjusting & Hypertension

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online