03. Reality and Myth-1.pdf - Reality and Myth u201cThe...

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Reality and Myth “The Ugly Duckling” and “In the Duck Yard”
Romanticism Movement in literary, visual, and other arts Prominent in Denmark during the first half of the 19 th century Influenced (but does not define) HC Andersen’s works Emphasizes the following: Caspar David Friedrich, Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog , 1818
Nature Heightened appreciation of natural beauty Nature as a source of artistic inspiration Walking through the countryside becomes a hobby of Romantics Partly a response to the changing landscapes of the Industrial Revolution Louis Janmot, The Poem of the Soul , before 1854
The Spirit Imagination as transcendent, capable of leading to spiritual truths Emotion and senses valued over reason and intellect The artist turns inward; passion and inner struggle become prized Partly a reaction against the rationalism of Enlightenment thinking William Blake, Albion Rose , 1794–95
Nationalism Obsession with gathering folk culture (e.g. legends, myth, folk tales) New interest in national and ethnic origins Revitalization of pagan and medieval materials Hans Gude , Fra Hardanger , 1847
The Weird Fascination with the exotic, occult, monstrous, mysterious, horrific, or even satanic Henry Fuseli, The Nightmare, 1781
The Exceptional Individual Interest in the solitary figure, the hero, or even the anti-hero Particular interest in the artist Often referred to as a “genius” Not necessarily intellectually gifted so much as creatively brilliant The artist figure as a creator, innovator, and rule-breaker Creative spirit trumps convention
The Ugly Duckling Trans.: “Illustration for: ‘The Ugly Duckling.’ Cut by H.C. Andersen at Basnæs”
The Ugly Duckling “He was in the egg too long, and that is why he doesn’t have the right shape.” Illustration by Vilhelm Pedersen, 1844 Late bloomer; a need to get out into the real world; maps well onto Andersen himself (gangly, awkward, oversized child)
The Ugly Duckling “He was in the egg too long, and that is why he doesn’t have the right shape.” “She has Spanish blood in her veins and is the most aristocratic fowl here.” Illustration by Vilhelm Pedersen, 1844 Animals interested in the nobility of their bloodlines (note: arbitrary; not meant to correlate with real world nationalities)

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