RADD 2501 Radiation Grids - Overview

RADD 2501 Radiation Grids - Overview - GRIDS OVERVIEW Grids...

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GRIDS OVERVIEW Grids A radiographic grid (most times referred to as a “Bucky” – although a “Bucky” is specifically a moving grid) should be used for body parts measuring greater than 10 cm thick, or when the kVp used is greater than 60. The purpose of the grid is to reduce Compton scatter radiation. The Compton scatter interaction with matter causes fog density that destroys image contrast. Loss of image contrast decreases the visibility of the anatomy in the image. Compton scatter increases as the body part thickness increases because there are more atoms in the path of the beam for the x-rays to scatter off of. Also, the probability of the Compton scatter interaction with matter occurring increases at greater than 60 kVp. The use of a radiographic grid increases the visibility of the image, but requires a substantial increase in patient exposure. Depending on the thickness of the grid, (the grid ratio) anywhere from 3 to 6 times the mAs – exposure to the patient. In 1913 Gustav Bucky introduced the stationary radiographic grid. It consisted of wide strips of lead arranged in two parallel series that intersected at right angles in a crosshatch pattern. Crosshatch grids are rarely used today and are never appropriate for Chiropractic practice as some radiographs require the beam to be angled cephalad or caudal. Grids
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course RADD 2501 taught by Professor Sandyeverage during the Winter '11 term at Life Chiropractic College West.

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RADD 2501 Radiation Grids - Overview - GRIDS OVERVIEW Grids...

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