RADD 2712 Lecture - Skeletal Rad B Classifications DFS Classification of Bone Tumors one of the main destroyers of bone Definitions Tumor(aka

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Skeletal Rad B – Classifications DFS Classification of Bone Tumors – one of the main destroyers of bone! Definitions : Tumor (aka Neoplasm) – Controlled or uncontrolled mitosis of cells beyond normal anatomical boundaries - irreversible alteration of cellular growth pattern. Any cell found in a multi-cellular tissue can become the site of a tumor. Typically respect a joint space. Infections usually do not (the other main destroyer of bone). I. Primary Bone Tumors – if the cell growth originates in the bone itself (not from the result of a metastatic disease) Bone-Forming Tumors – come from the bone cells themselves o Benign – Controlled growth Osteoma – consider a ‘common’ tumor. Great fondness for bones that develop intramembranously (cranial vault and nasal concha). They are NEVER in the medullay cavity, meaning they grow away from the cortical surfaces . Usually solitary but can be multiple indicative of gardener’s syndrome. Usually Asymtomatic (no pain) Osteoid Osteoma – Symptomatic = PAIN!!! Also progressively painful. Usually very small Osteoblastoma – Rarest of the three. 30-50% are spinal though. They like the appendages of the posterior arch (in VBS) – TPs, laminas, spinous processes. Symptomatic – PAIN!!! o Malignant – all involve some kind of ‘Osteosarcoma’. Which is the version of all the malignant. Uncontrolled Growth (Central) Osteosarcoma – A combination of Lytic and Sclerotic (Blastic). Horrible prognosis! Happens predominantly in teenagers. Par/osteal Osteosarcoma – 4% of osteosarcoma Peri/osteal Osteosarcoma – about 1% of all Osteosarcoma
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Osteosarcomatosis – multi-focal. About 1% of all osteosarcoma. Osteosarcoma of the Mandible – about 4%. Older patient group. Post-radiation Osteosarcoma – Total exposure >3,500 Rads per year Malignant Degeneration of Paget’s Disease. Degenerate from a pre-existing benign lesion – Fibrous Dysplasia could degenerate into an osteosarcoma. Teleangiectasis – vascular 3% Cartilage-Forming Tumors – always radiolucent and most of the time they calcify (THEY LIKE Ca++) o Benign – going most common to least. Solitary Osteochondroma – truly from the cartilage. Asymp. Chondroma/Enchondroma – medullary (enchondroma) OR cortical (Chondroma or Juxtachondroma). Most are medullary. Asymptomatic Chondromyxoid Fibroma – Junk Tumor. Likes the Tibia and PAINFUL!! Chondroblastoma – Painful and commonly epiphyseal. Can also happen on the Apophyseal. o Malignant Central Chondrosarcoma – 1/3, inside the bone Peripheral Chondrosarcoma – 2/3, degenerate from pre-existing benign cartilaginous tumors. Produces a soft-tisssue mass. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone (Osteoclastoma) – love the metaphysis
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course RADD 2712 taught by Professor R.brucefox during the Winter '11 term at Life Chiropractic College West.

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RADD 2712 Lecture - Skeletal Rad B Classifications DFS Classification of Bone Tumors one of the main destroyers of bone Definitions Tumor(aka

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