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RADD 2712 Skeletal Radd B Study Guide WITHOUT Answers

RADD 2712 Skeletal Radd B Study Guide WITHOUT Answers -...

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Yochum & Rowe Study Questions Answers looked up and explained by Melanie Carr 1) A periosteal reaction of “trimmed whiskers” - very thin, fairly short spicules of reactive new bone - is most typical of: a) Parosteal sarcoma. b) Central osteosarcoma. c) Ewing’s sarcoma. d) Chondrosarcoma. 2) In male patients, the primary source of skeletal metastasis is a primary tumor in the: 3) The pathognomic lesion seen in the metastasis of neuroblastoma to the skull is: 4) In both the cervical and thoracolumbar spine, neurofibromas may cause: 5) Paget’s disease may be radiographically distinguished from fibrous dysplasia because Paget’s will commonly have: a) A hazy, “ground glass” appearance. b) Pseudofractures. c) Bowing deformities in the long tubular bones. d) Subarticular long bone lesions. 6) The typical radiologic appearance of a periosteal chondroma includes a classic triad of: a) Endosteal scalloping, eccentric expansion of the bone, and a calcified cartilaginous matrix. b) Cortical scalloping, overhanging body edges, and a calcified cartilaginous matrix. c) A distinct soft tissue mass, cortical scalloping, and a calcified, cartilaginous matrix. d) Eccentric bone expansion, a distinct soft tissue mass, and a calcified, cartilaginous matrix. 7) Clinically, aneurismal bone cysts: 8) The triad of abnormal growths seen in almost half of the cases of Gardner’s syndrome consists of:
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