05-Sep08u[1] - Kobe Earthquake in Japan 1995 Volcanic...

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THE EARTH 3 rd Rock From the Sun Why should we study it? Best studied example of a planet Compare contrast properties with other planets Start of Comparative Planetology
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The blue Marble: The Earth from Clementine
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Crescent Earth: Photo by Apollo 12 Astronauts on the Way to the Moon
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Radioactive dating and the age of the Earth
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Earthquakes devastate…
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Seismology
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The Internal Structure of the Earth From Seismology • The dynamic Earth => Earthquakes • Seismic waves travel through Earth – Primary or P-waves: Longitudinal waves • Compressional waves, like sound waves – Secondary or S-waves: Transverse Waves • Ocean surface, string • Detection yields information on interior chemical composition and state
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Seismic Waves
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Inner Structure of the Earth Revealed From Seismology
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Circulation in the Asthenosphere
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Mantle sliding over asthenosphere
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Tectonic Activity in Lithosphere of present-day Earth
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Earth ` s Surface 170 Million Years Ago
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Earth ` s Surface 70 Million Years Ago
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Volcano!
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Eruption on Kilauea
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Unformatted text preview: Kobe Earthquake in Japan 1995 Volcanic Crater Most common l Landscape on Our Planet Atmosphere, Ocean, and Rotation Create the Coriolis drift The Unique and Dynamic Surface of the Earth: A Scene From the French Alps Crumpled crust creates uplifted areas Weathering by wind and water makes peaks valleys and canyons Deposition of eroded sediments creates soil The Greenhouse effect and a warm Earth: Global Warming How greenhouse gasses work Fig. 6-10, p. 118 Meteor Crater in Arizona Impact cratering a thing of the past? NO! What have we learned from the Earth from the standpoint of comparative planetology ? Massive terrestrial planet Radioactive heating => asthenosphere, plate tectonics, volcanism => magnetic Feld Atmosphere => erosion, surface features relatively young, carbon dioxide and the greenhouse effect, temperature near triple-point for water Rotation and atmosphere => storms and weather...
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05-Sep08u[1] - Kobe Earthquake in Japan 1995 Volcanic...

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