Research paper full - A Symbolic Interactionist Approach to Family Marriage and Divorce Whitney Antoniono Group 6 Mikki Arnold Group 6 Katie

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A Symbolic Interactionist Approach to Family, Marriage and Divorce Whitney Antoniono – Group 6 Mikki Arnold – Group 6 Katie Kratkiewicz – Group 3 The University of Texas at Austin SOC 302 – October 25, 2011
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A Symbolic Interactionist Approach to Family, Marriage and Divorce Within the past fifty years, the traditional, nuclear family has become diminished by more than fifty percent (Leik and Schiller 1963). The changing of ideas or symbols about love, parenthood, marriage, relationships, and divorce over last half of a century has greatly altered the roles which once existed in a family and a marriage. The symbolic interactionist approach to the institution of family idealizes about such symbols as it focuses on the individuals within the institution rather than the entity of family as it is related to society as a whole. While family as an institution has vastly changed over the years, it is the basic, social interactions between its members that influence the roles a person takes on, as well as the characteristics a person portrays; having two fathers instead of a mother and a father is not what changes a society. FAMILY AS AN INSTITUTE OF SOCIETY Family is a social group, united through bonds of kinship or marriage. Exactly how society defines a family is reflected upon the specific society and the level of importance the society places within family. A conceptual foundation in family studies is the family development theory, which was developed by Evelyn Duvall (Laszloffy). This theory “offers a unique way of thinking about and studying families and their individual members” and is the “most popular and widely used” theory above the other variation of theories (Laszloffy 206). The family development theory is “defined in terms of eight developmental stages” and is clearly based “on a traditional, nuclear, intact family form and does not consider families whose lifecycles are characterized by alternative developmental sequences” (Laszloffy 206). The nuclear family consists of parents, joined together by marriage and the children in which were conceived from the two spouses. According to Jay Teachman, Lucky Tedrow and Kyle Crowder, “the American family has never been static” (pg. 1234). Family has never been
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not in a state of transition. As years pass and society evolves, the institution of family seems to evolve simultaneously (Crowder, Teachman, and Tedrow). Our society “is made up of a multiplicity of family types” and some examples of the variety of types are “two-parent families, one-parent families, cohabitating couples, gay and lesbian families, and extended-family households” (Crowder, Teachman and Tedrow 1234). The United States Census defines a family as a group of two persons or more (one of
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This note was uploaded on 11/27/2011 for the course SOC 302 taught by Professor Langenkamp during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Research paper full - A Symbolic Interactionist Approach to Family Marriage and Divorce Whitney Antoniono Group 6 Mikki Arnold Group 6 Katie

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