Ohms Law - BRAE 216 Fundamentals of Electricity Lecture 2...

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BRAE 216 Fundamentals of Electricity Lecture 2 Resistors Special components called resistors are made for the express purpose of creating a precise quantity of resistance for insertion into a circuit. They are typically constructed of metal wire or carbon, and engineered to maintain a stable resistance value over a wide range of environmental conditions. Unlike lamps, they do not produce light, but they do produce heat as electric power is dissipated by them in a working circuit. Typically, though, the purpose of a resistor is not to produce usable heat, but simply to provide a precise quantity of electrical resistance. The most common schematic symbol for a resistor is a zig-zag line: Resistor values in ohms are usually shown as an adjacent number, and if several resistors are present in a circuit, they will be labeled with a unique identifier number such as R 1 , R 2 , R 3 , etc. As you can see, resistor symbols can be shown either horizontally or vertically: Real resistors look nothing like the zig-zag symbol. Resistors can also be shown to have varying rather than fixed resistances. Potentiometers – variable resistor controls voltage Rheostat – variable resistor controls current
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BRAE 216 Fundamentals of Electricity Lecture 2 Ohms Law Reading Chap 2.3 Recall time (Coulombs) charge of amount = = t Q I (Coulombs) charge of amount (joules) energy = = Q W V Things you can use to relate this to real life. Reality check.
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