In no scene is the exaggerated melancholy and simple cynicism of Jaques more clearly evident than he

In no scene is the exaggerated melancholy and simple cynicism of Jaques more clearly evident than he

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Unformatted text preview: In no scene is the exaggerated melancholy and simple cynicism of Jaques more clearly evident than here. He opens his meeting with Rosalind's father by relating an encounter he has just had with Touchstone. In the encounter, Jaques was completely taken in by the clown. He was totally unaware that Touchstone was parodying Jaques' own style of speech. Instead, Jaques found Touchstone's remarks to be so profound that he wishes that he could be a fool himself. Touchstone's comments, thus, foreshadow Jaques' well-known "Seven Ages of Man" speech: Tis but an hour ago since it was nine; And after one hour more 'twill be eleven; And so, from hour to hour, we ripe and ripe And then, from hour to hour, we rot and rot; And thereby hangs a tale. (24-28) One might also note that the sun dial that Touchstone produces is an unlikely, absurd instrument to...
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In no scene is the exaggerated melancholy and simple cynicism of Jaques more clearly evident than he

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