DIG2500c_lecture2

DIG2500c_lecture2 - Fall 2009 Semester Dr. Rudy McDaniel...

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DIG2500c: Fundamentals of Interactive Design Fall 2009 Semester Dr. Rudy McDaniel Lecture 2: Speak
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Lab #1 Discussion Lab #1 is available on the course web site. Review Questions?
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This week We’re focusing on the aspects of interactivity from the technical point of view Recall the Crawford definition is the cycle of SPEAKING THINKING LISTENING
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Part 1: How humans speak
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Petroglyphs 10,000 BC
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Pictograms 6,000 – 5,000 BC
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Ideograms Now, symbols mean more than just what they resemble.
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Writing
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The Gutenberg Press Developed by Johannes Gutenberg around 1440 Introduced portability to communicative media
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Semaphores Mechanical devices attached to buildings communicated information using visual signs Popular in the late 18th and
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The Last Working Semaphore http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdl6zMh7ZM
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Early Forms of Telegraphy We don’t need technology to have interactive media!
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Early Forms of Telegraphy (cont.) Observable from a distance, smoke, fire, and drumbeats could be interpreted and responding to using similar media and vocabularies.
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Telegraph
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Radio Thomas Edison, 1891 (electrostatic coupling) Marconi, 1895 (patent for transmitting
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DIG2500c_lecture2 - Fall 2009 Semester Dr. Rudy McDaniel...

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