Lecture 14 Biomaterials I

Lecture 14 Biomaterials I - Biomaterials for Tissue...

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Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering Dr. Frame BME 100 October 24, 2011
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Biomaterials for tissue engineering “Smart” designs for tissue-engineered matrix include biocompatible polymer for backbone matrix bioactive materials as a stimulant for cell activity such as migration, proliferation and/or differentiation.
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Biomaterials for tissue engineering (biocompatible polymer) Biocompatible polymers may be composed of one or several natural or synthetic subunits linked together in almost infinite possible arrays. Such polymers ultimately form either scaffolds and hydrogels. Scaffolds have defined pore size and a micro- architecture Hydrogels have vertual pores but no micro- architecture
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Biomaterials for tissue engineering (bioactive material) Bioactive materials may include Peptides, such as cell adhesive ligands growth and/or differentiation factors, antibiotics or anti-inflammatory drugs Such bioactive materials can be incorporated into polymers covalently or non convalently.
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Synthetic Polymers
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Synthetic polymers in tissue engineering cartilage Hydrogel, coating, solid Poly(ethylene glycol) Cartilage, nerve Solid/sponge/hydrogel Poly(vinyl alcohol) Bone, cardiovascular Solid, copolymer hydrogel Poly(propylene fumarate) Bone, drug delivery Solid, cross-linked network Poly(andhydride) Cartilage, bone, muscle, nerve, blood vessel, valves, bladder, drug delivery, liver, cardiac tissue Solid/fiber, tube, sponge, screw, etc. Poly(esters) Poly(glycolic acid) Poly(lactic acid) Poly(caprolactane) Potential Clinical Applications Physical Characteristics Polymer Palsson, Bernard, Tissue Engineering . Pearson Prentice Hall Bioengineering, NJ USA, 2004
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Synthetic polymers Pros Easy to make User friendly Adjustable physical properties Easily degraded Multiple formations possible Cons Poor mechanical properties Easily degraded Prothrombotic, immunogenic Expensive to manufacture Difficult to sterilize
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Synthetic polymers Polymer properties vary with chain length solid 4002 C atoms CH 3 (CH 2 CH 2 ) 2000 CH 3 Polyethylene wax 22 C atoms CH 3 (CH 2 CH 2 ) 10 CH 3 Paraffin liquid 4 C atoms CH 3 -CH 2 -CH 2 -CH 3 Butane gas 2 C atoms CH 3 -CH 3 Ethane http://mrcemis.ms.nwu.edu/polymer/
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Types of synthetic polymers Branched polymers (single monomer): a etc || a a a-a-a-a-etc. | | | etc.-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a- etc. | | | | a a a a | | | etc. a-a-etc. a
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Types of synthetic polymers Homopolymers: single monomer Copolymers: multiple monomers Random – A – B – B – A – B – A –A –A Alternating–A–B–A–B–A–B–A Block–A–A–A–A–B–B–B–B–B
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Types of synthetic polymers Graft copolymers: etc.-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a- a-a-a-etc.
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This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course BME 100 taught by Professor Dr.frame during the Spring '11 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Lecture 14 Biomaterials I - Biomaterials for Tissue...

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