Yet Malcolm - Yet Malcolm's attitude toward whites had...

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Unformatted text preview: Yet Malcolm's attitude toward whites had begun to moderate. He now considered the white man, collectively, to have acted as the devil; individually, whites could be cleared of responsibility if they held proper attitudes. He had begun to place the blame, not on the individual white man, but upon the structure of society itself. He had begun speaking on college campuses during this time and was surprised to find the audiences less hostile than he expected. He was now beginning to communicate with educated whites and was beginning to realize that some of them did wish to help solve the problems he was dealing with. Chapter Sixteen, like the preceding chapter, deals with the years 1961 to 1964. But whereas the preceding chapter dealt with Malcolm's rising reputation and intellectual development during these years, Malcolm now deals with the causes of his split with the Nation of Islam — primarily Elijah...
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This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course ENG 1320 taught by Professor Bost during the Fall '09 term at Texas State.

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Yet Malcolm - Yet Malcolm's attitude toward whites had...

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