Francisco indicates that Rearden is virtuous and a moral paragon because of his industriousness

Francisco indicates that Rearden is virtuous and a moral paragon because of his industriousness

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Unformatted text preview: Francisco indicates that Rearden is virtuous and a moral paragon because of his industriousness, not in spite of it. Rearden must understand his own greatness. He must embrace a joyous pride in his life-giving achievements and reject any guilt that his family asks him to feel. Francisco offers Rearden the beginnings of validation and a moral sanction that Rearden doesn't yet fully realize he needs. Rearden doesn't even have the words yet to define his situation, but somehow he knows that he needs the sanction that Francisco offers. Dagny's attendance at the party, the beauty of her appearance, and her disappointment at Rearden's indifference reveal her romantic attraction to him. Rearden's rigid formality, and the way he takes Lillian's side regarding the bracelet, offers his own subtle indication that he has similar feelings for Dagny. Rearden holds himself to the strictest standards of justice. Despite the fact that he feels only Dagny....
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This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course ENG 1320 taught by Professor Bost during the Fall '09 term at Texas State.

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