Franklin includes a memo at this point stating that the account he first wrote

Franklin includes a memo at this point stating that the account he first wrote

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Unformatted text preview: Franklin includes a memo at this point stating that the account he first wrote, of family anecdotes with little public interest, had been interrupted by the American Revolution. What follows was written to comply with advice in two appended letters, and is intended for the public. The letters from Abel James and Benjamin Vaughan urge Franklin to continue his memoirs, primarily because his life will provide a good example for others, especially young people. Vaughan gives many more arguments, emphasizing that Franklin's story should be one of the age's worthiest. Franklin wrote the second part of his memoirs without having a copy of his first part (though James had sent him his outline), so he begins by repeating his account of the Pennsylvania Public Library. At the time of its founding, he says, this institution was needed because there were no good...
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This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course ENG 1320 taught by Professor Bost during the Fall '09 term at Texas State.

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