Socially -...

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Socially, Ella was in the upper class of Boston black society. She lived in the "Hill" section of  Roxbury, the part of Boston in which blacks were permitted to live. There was a sharp social  distinction between the successful, middle-class "Hill Negroes" of Ella's neighborhood and the lower- class people of the ghetto, the "Town" section. Actually, the social standing of the Hill Negroes  generally depended upon menial jobs, but they attached a great deal of self-importance to these  jobs. Bank janitors referred to themselves as being "in finance"; household servants were "with an  old family." Malcolm saw this identification of social status by occupation as an aping of the white  social structure, on a lower scale. Another borrowing from white society was the snobbery of the native New England blacks toward the  outsiders, mostly Southerners and West Indians. The New Englanders generally considered 
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This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course ENG 1320 taught by Professor Bost during the Fall '09 term at Texas State.

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