The Franklin papers grew famous because an experiment that he had suggested

The Franklin papers grew famous because an experiment that he had suggested

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Unformatted text preview: The Franklin papers grew famous because an experiment that he had suggested drawing lightning from the clouds was executed successfully in France and excited the public. After hearing of the continental stir over Franklin's experiments, the Royal Society of London began to consider the papers seriously. They made amends for their former neglect by making Franklin an honorary member, excused from yearly dues. They also presented him the gold medal of Sir Godfrey Copley for 1753, which was delivered at a public dinner by Pennsylvania's new Governor, Denny. During the customary after-dinner drinking, Denny called Franklin aside and suggested that they could make many mutually advantageous arrangements if Franklin would help persuade the Assembly to pass bills exempting Proprietary estates from taxes. Franklin replied that, fortunately, he was prosperous enough to need no special favors, and as an Assembly member could not possibly...
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