The political structure Franklin envisioned included a President

The political structure Franklin envisioned included a President

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The political structure Franklin envisioned included a President-General appointed by the Crown,  and a Grand Council of each Assembly's representatives. But the Assemblies rejected the plan  because it gave too much power to the Crown's administrators, whereas England rejected it as too  democratic. Franklin felt in retrospect that his plan had probably been the best compromise between  all interests, and that it would have avoided the Revolution, had it been put into effect. The Governor  of Pennsylvania liked the proposal; but its Assembly opponents arranged to present it in Franklin's  absence, and Pennsylvania mortified Franklin by voting not to consider it. Franklin met in New York with the Province's new governor, Mr. Morris, who asked how he could  avoid so turbulent an administration as his predecessor's. Franklin advised him to avoid disputes  with the Assembly; but Morris loved arguing, so was soon at odds with his government. Though 
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This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course ENG 1320 taught by Professor Bost during the Fall '09 term at Texas State.

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