Puritans and Indians

Puritans and Indians - colonial venture in New England as...

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Puritans and Indians, 1600-1700 Detail from John Seller, Mapp of New England , ca. 1675.
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New England in the mid- Seventeenth Century. Map: By Jeffery Ward in Alan Taylor, American Colonies (New York, 2001)
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The Pequot War, 1637 The destruction of the Pequot village on the Mystic River in 1637 by the New English (armed with guns in the inner circle of the attackers) and their Mohegan and Narraganset allies (shooting their bows in the outer circle). From John Underhill, Newes from America (London, 1638).
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John Eliot’s Indian Bible John Eliot, Puritan missionary to the Algonquian Indians, translated and published the Bible in Algonquian in 1663. It was the first Bible in any language published in English America. At Natick, Eliot taught the Indians to read the Bible in their own language and many of the “Praying Town” became critics of the English
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Unformatted text preview: colonial venture in New England as they noted the many deviations of colonial behavior from Christian injunctions. Image: The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. King Philips War An eighteenth-century woodcut of King Philip, by engraver and silversmith Paul Revere. No contemporaneous images of Metacom, or King Philip, exist perhaps as an indication of New Englands extensive efforts of rid and silence New England of its Indian forebears. Image: Philip, King of Mount Hope, 1772. Memorial Hall Museum, Deerfield, Massachusetts. Mary Rowlandson The frontispiece to the 1773 edition of Mary Rowlandsons captivity narrative. Rowlandsons narrative was one of the most frequently reprinted pieces of writing in the New England colonies in the era before the American Revolution....
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2008 for the course HIST 205 taught by Professor Lewis during the Fall '06 term at American.

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Puritans and Indians - colonial venture in New England as...

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