Pre-Lab Electric Fields and Potentials

Pre-Lab Electric Fields and Potentials - In other words,...

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4.) According to the equation E = F/q, E=0 when F=0. Experimentally, we are able to tell where E = 0 whenever the net force acting on a positive test charge equals zero. By placing an object in the electric field and testing the charge on it, we are able to tell if E = 0. The alternative form to this equation, E = lim |deltaV/delta r|, shows that E = 0 when the voltage is equal to zero. 5.) According to the equation E = lim |ΔV/Δr|, the electric field is greatest when the change in voltage is greatest and the radius to the equipotential surface is the smallest. The patterns of equipotentials show that an electric field is more intense near the charge, where the equipotentials are closely spaced, rather than far away from the charge, where the equipotentials are widely spaces. 6.) Electric field lines are denser where E has a greater magnitude.
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Unformatted text preview: In other words, the number of lines that are drawn to or from a charge indicate the magnitude of the charge. 9.) Electric field lines have arrows because they occur in a specific direction and are indicative of the electric direction of the electric field. Equipotential lines do not have arrows because equipotential lines have the same voltage at every point on the surface and it is by convention that the field points in the perpendicular direction to the equipotential surface. There is therefore no need to label the equipotential with directional arrows. 10.) Electric field lines can never cross because they are always tangent to the electric field. Electric forces can only point in one direction and because the electric force lines are an indication of that direction, they cannot point in conflicting directions....
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This note was uploaded on 11/27/2011 for the course PHYS 105 taught by Professor Walker during the Fall '08 term at UNC.

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