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Sensation & Perception

Sensation & Perception - Dr Jeannie Loeb Sensation...

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Dr. Jeannie Loeb Sensation & Perception
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Sensation: objective biological processes that environmental stimuli evoke Perception: subjective experience of sensations I. Sensation vs. Perception
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Stimulus: Electromagnetic radiation visible “light” is between the range of 380 and 760 nanometers (billionths of a meter). I. Sensation vs. Perception II. Vision
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STIMULUS Our perception of the stimulus rattlesnakes birds
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Properties of the stimulus: Wavelength = color I. Sensation vs. Perception II. Vision Long wavelength e.g., RED Short wavelength e.g., BLUE The distance from peak- to-peak is wavelength
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R O Y G. B (I) ndigo not shown V
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Properties of the stimulus: Wavelength = color Amplitude = brightness I. Sensation vs. Perception II. Vision BRIGHTER DIMMER Note that the wavelength, and therefore the perceived color, would be the same in both cases.
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Properties of the stimulus: Wavelength = color Amplitude = brightness Purity = saturation if you have many different wavelengths, the picture won’t look as “vivid.” if you have a picture with fairly uniform wavelengths (e.g., the blue is comprised of a bunch of similar wavelengths), then you are likely to see a more vivid color I. Sensation vs. Perception II. Vision
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Anatomy of the eye I. Sensation vs. Perception II. Vision
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CORNE A PUPIL IRIS LEN S RETINA ? ? ? ? ?
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Retina anatomy I. Sensation vs. Perception II. Vision Eyeball Photoreceptors Bipolar cells Ganglion cells Ganglion axons
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Retina anatomy I. Sensation vs. Perception II. Vision
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Retina rods & cones: transduction I. Sensation vs. Perception II. Vision Eyeball Ganglion axons
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I. Sensation vs. Perception II. Vision Photoreceptors rods & cones RODS CONES *scotopic *photopic/greater visual acuity *more than cones *less than rods *peripheral to fovea *more in center of retina (i.e.fovea)
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I. Sensation vs. Perception II. Vision Photoreceptors rods & cones FOVEA: only cones
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I. Sensation vs. Perception II. Vision Adaptation to darkness cones: quicker rods: more thorough shows how we adapt to the dark shows what part of adaptation is due to cones shows what part of adaptation is due to rods
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I. Sensation vs. Perception II. Vision Color Vision Trichromatic theory (proposed by Young, refined by Helmholtz) Opponent Process Theory (proposed by Hering) .
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I. Sensation vs. Perception II. Vision Color Vision Trichromatic theory .
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I. Sensation vs. Perception II. Vision Color Vision Trichromatic theory Research support If abnormalities with cones .
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I. Sensation vs. Perception II. Vision Color Vision Trichromatic theory Weaknesses? No bluish-yellow; reddish- green Complementary afterimage .
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