Adleman-ScAm94

To build a computer only two things are really

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Unformatted text preview: . None of these appeared likely to help play chess, but there was another important fact that the great logicians of the 1930s taught us: computation is easy. To build a computer, only two things are really necessary—a method of storing information and a few simple operations for acting on that information. The Turing machine stores information as sequences of letters on tape and manipulates that information with the simple instructions in the finite control. An electronic computer stores information as sequences of zeros and ones in memory and manipulates that information with the operations available on the processor chip. The remarkable thing is that just about any method of storing information and any set of operations to act on that information are good enough. Good enough for what? For universal computation—computing anything that can be computed. To get your computer to make Watson-Crick complements or to play chess, you need only start with the correct input information and apply the right sequence of operatio...
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This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course COMP 790 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at UNC.

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