Temp - Infant Learning Two Types of Declarative Learning...

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Unformatted text preview: Infant Learning Two Types of Declarative Learning Early Learning (Novel Items) No prior knowledge available. Must construct representation of some part of the world from perceptual input. Infants are necessarily early learners. Mature Learning (Familiar Items) Elaboration of prior knowledge, i.e., elaboration of semantic network. 0 – 6 Months Infants like to look at faces and are born with emotional (happy, sad, angry, distressed) and social knowledge. At birth, infants can suck, move their eyes and head from side to side to look at objects, and kick. At 3 months the visual system can encode faces At 3 months an infant can remember an action that she cannot yet perform Mobile Task Most of what we know about infant learning and long-term retention comes from the fact that an infant will kick to move a mobile. This is the basis of an experimental paradigm measuring what the infant learns Method Without operant contingency there is no learning Long-Term Retention Test = Baseline Baseline Ratio Long-term Retention Test = Retention Immediate Ratio Retention Test Reinforcement No Reinforcement Durations of Session Components Baseline – 1 or 2 min Acquisition – 4 or 6 min Immediate Retention Test – 30 sec or 1 min Infant Memory Task To test infant memory for having been able to move a mobile by kicking, the infant must be tested when his foot is not connected to the mobile. Kick rate at test is compared with kick rate prior to training when the infant’s foot was also not connected to the mobile. Effect of Study Variables on Retention Interval in Mobile Task – 3- 6 Months Retention interval is a function of: training session duration number of training sessions interval lengths between sessions Hence retention interval is a function of the number of repetitions and the intervals between repetitions Retention interval is a function of age (2 sessions 24 hours apart) For children 6-months and up pressing a button makes a train move Effect of age, number of sessions, and inter-...
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This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 830:303 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Rutgers.

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Temp - Infant Learning Two Types of Declarative Learning...

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