chapter_11 - Chapter 11 Motivation and Engagement Themes of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 11 Motivation and Engagement Themes of the chapter Engagement Motivation Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation Psychological needs Curiosity, interest and positive affect Calming anxiety, protecting self-worth, and overcoming fear of failure
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Guiding Questions What is engagement, and why is it important? What is motivation? What is the difference between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation? How can teachers support students’ psychological needs? How can teachers motivate students during uninteresting activities?
Background image of page 2
Guiding Questions (cont’d) In what ways can teachers spark students’ engagement? In what ways can teachers calm students’ anxieties and fears? How can teachers engage diverse learners and students with special needs?
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Engagement Refers to the behavioral intensity, emotional quality, and personal investment in a student’s involvement during a learning activity
Background image of page 4
Aspects of Engagement Behavioral – the extent to which a student displays on-task attention, strong effort, and enduring persistence on a learning activity Emotional – the extent to which a student’s task involvement is characterized by positive emotion, such as interest and enjoyment
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Aspects of Engagement (continued) Cognitive – extent to which a student mentally goes beyond the basic requirements of a learning activity and invests himself in the learning in a committed way Voice – a student’s expression of self during a learning activity so as to influence constructively how the teacher presents that lesson
Background image of page 6
Why Engagement is Important It makes learning possible It predicts how well students fare in school, especially their achievement and eventual completion of school It is malleable and hence, open to increase It gives teachers the moment-to-moment feedback they need to determine how well their efforts to motivate students are working
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Motivation Any force that energizes and directs behavior Different types of motivation exist Some types of motivation produce better academic functioning than do other types To flourish, motivation needs supportive conditions in the learning environment
Background image of page 8
Approaches to Promoting Motivation and Engagement Traditional / behavioral approach – teacher directly motivates students Teacher offers an attractive incentive. Students work hard to gain it. Teacher warns of an unattractive consequence. Students work hard to avoid it. Teacher models appropriate behavior. Students emulate what they see.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Approaches to Promoting Motivation and Engagement (cont’d) Dialectical approach – teacher supports students’ existing motivation Students express an interest. Teacher incorporates that interest into the lesson and offers supportive resources. Students suggest a goal to strive for. Teacher
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course EDUCATION 300:306 at Rutgers.

Page1 / 39

chapter_11 - Chapter 11 Motivation and Engagement Themes of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online