Madame Ratignolle is introduced in this chapter as the embodiment of the

Madame Ratignolle is introduced in this chapter as the embodiment of the

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Unformatted text preview: Madame Ratignolle is introduced in this chapter as the embodiment of the "mother-women," the Creole wives who always place husband and children before themselves. Because Edna's behavior and attitudes differ from the mother-women's, Lonce sometimes doubts Edna's devotion to her children. Madame Ratignolle, sewing winter garments for her children, openly makes references to her pregnancy, which shocks Edna who is taken aback by mention of any matter pertaining to sex. Edna finds that Creole women do not share such taboos and are more open to discussion and literature containing references to sexual matters. The key development in this chapter is the distinction Chopin makes between Edna and the mother- women, those women who, nun-like, "esteemed it a holy privilege to efface themselves as individuals and grow wings as ministering angels." Such winged angels are quite different from the individuals and grow wings as ministering angels....
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This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course ENG 1310 taught by Professor Pilkington during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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