She has invested time and energy into imagining her first meeting with Robert and is unprepared for

She has invested time and energy into imagining her first meeting with Robert and is unprepared for

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Unformatted text preview: She has invested time and energy into imagining her first meeting with Robert and is unprepared for the harsh reality of their first encounter. Their route to Edna's house takes them through a decidedly non-romantic, even sordid neighborhood, "picking their way across muddy streets and sidewalks encumbered with the cheap display of small tradesmen." Rarely in the novel does Chopin describe a physically unpleasant scene; she uses the device here to underscore Edna's disillusionment with the reality of seeing Robert. When they reach her home, Robert finds a photograph of Arobin. His reaction confirms the low opinion other men have of Arobin: "do you think his head is worth drawing?" Naturally Edna does not reveal the nature of her relationship with Arobin, but presses Robert to tell her what he thought about while in Mexico. His answer, that he thought of nothing but his summer on Grande Isle and felt like a while in Mexico....
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This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course ENG 1310 taught by Professor Pilkington during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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