After Lewis shows us A Typical Day in the Life of George F

After Lewis shows us A Typical Day in the Life of George F...

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Unformatted text preview: After Lewis shows us A Typical Day in the Life of George F. Babbitt, he now focuses on one of the favorite targets of America's satirists: the American cocktail-dinner party. George and Myra Babbitt give a party for 12 people, and it is, Lewis says, one of the "great events" of Babbitt's spring. Lewis, however, intends for this section of the novel to be more than just an excuse for him to laugh at Americans trying to be very clever and important; he uses this party to bring to a crisis some of the discontent that we have seen festering within Babbitt. After the guests have gone home and Myra has given Babbitt permission to go early to the Maine woods with Paul, Babbitt is faced, for the first time in his life, with an entirely new challenge: freedom. His frustrated longing to escape has been gratified, and he has never been so frightened.His frustrated longing to escape has been gratified, and he has never been so frightened....
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