Although Mademoiselle Reisz is not introduced until Chapter 9

Although Mademoiselle Reisz is not introduced until Chapter 9

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Unformatted text preview: Although Mademoiselle Reisz is not introduced until Chapter 9, she is represented in the novel's opening scene by the mockingbird. Chopin describes the parrot (which symbolizes Edna) as speaking "a language which nobody understood, unless it was the mockingbird that hung on the other side of the door." Madame Reisz's piano playing speaks to Edna's soul as if that music were the language her soul had been waiting in silence for, awakening grand passions in Edna's soul and sparking her later rebellion. Mockingbirds have a reputation as obnoxious birds, and Madame Reisz shares a similar reputation as a rude, ill-tempered woman. The description of the mockingbird also sets the tone for Madame Reisz's independent behavior within the confines of the insistently polite upper-class Creole society; she too whistles her own tune "with maddening persistence." Mademoiselle Reisz's isolation, both she too whistles her own tune "with maddening persistence....
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This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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