Babbitt always sees his children several times each day

Babbitt always sees his children several times each day -...

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Unformatted text preview: Babbitt always sees his children several times each day, but aside from his concern about their expenditures, he never pays much attention to them. Now, however, Kenneth Escott's attentions to Verona arouse his interest. Babbitt also starts to worry about Ted. His son is a good athlete and mechanic and is involved in all the social activities of his high school, but his academic grades are low. Furthermore, Ted seems opposed to attending college or law school; even worse, the boy is evidently very fond of Eunice Littlefield. Babbitt likes the girl he has known her since she was a child but he considers her flighty and immature. Her greatest ambition is to become a movie star. Toward the end of his senior year, Ted has a party at home for his classmates. Babbitt and Myra try to be helpful, but they soon learn that the youngsters do not appreciate their efforts. In addition, to be helpful, but they soon learn that the youngsters do not appreciate their efforts....
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