Babbitt feels that he must assert his independence

Babbitt feels that he must assert his independence -...

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Unformatted text preview: Babbitt feels that he must assert his independence; he refuses to commit himself. Gunch becomes indignant and warns Babbitt that in the struggle between decency and Americanism on the one hand and red tyranny on the other, everyone must take sides. The League, he says, considers anyone who does not join to be an enemy. That night, Babbitt worries fearfully about the consequences of his behavior. There are two schools of thought about the newly emerging George F. Babbitt. To his fellow club members, Babbitt has, inexplicably, become a "crank," while Babbitt thinks of himself as possibly a highly original man: successful, conservative, yet touched with wisdom. He sees himself as a courageous pioneer one who crosses social strata in the name of decency. And in addition to Babbitt's new belief in humanity, he has a beautiful and usually discreet ladylove. With Myra gone, Babbitt's new belief in humanity, he has a beautiful and usually discreet ladylove....
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