Chopin also uses wing imagery in her characterization of mother

Chopin also uses wing imagery in her characterization of mother

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Unformatted text preview: Chopin also uses wing imagery in her characterization of mother-women: "They were women...esteemed it a holy privilege to efface themselves as individuals and grow wings as ministering angels." This angel image contrasts sharply with the bad-tempered parrot and its caged compatriot, the mockingbird, as do the very personalities of those characters they represent. The mother-women willingly allow their angel wings to be clipped by their way of life, made unsuitable for flight, in exchange for the security that accompanies their roles. As wives of wealthy businessmen, they are rewarded for carrying out their domesticated role with a place in upper-class society, lovely homes, fine clothes, and all of the other privileges and prestige that accompany their social position. Yet their acceptance of these rewards makes them beholden to their husbands, ensuring their...
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