Mandelet implies that the concept of motherhood as an integral and inevitable part of women

Mandelet implies that the concept of motherhood as an integral and inevitable part of women

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Unformatted text preview: Mandelet implies that the concept of motherhood as an integral and inevitable part of women's lives is constructed in part by society and in part by the most basic hormonal working of human biology — society's romanticized image of motherhood "seems to be a provision of Nature; a decoy to secure mothers for the race." This illusion disregards the trauma of childbirth and the dissatisfaction that some women feel with the constraints of motherhood. If a woman in Edna's culture responds to this dissatisfaction and seeks to give up marriage and motherhood in order to follow what she feels is her true path, she is condemned outright. If Edna divorces Léonce, she will be utterly ostracized. In his counsel to Edna, the doctor insists that he would understand what she is going through, should she choose to confide in him. He is well versed in human nature, after all. The discrepancy in their she choose to confide in him....
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This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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