6 - p. 43 MIT Department of Chemistry 5.74, Spring 2004:...

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MIT Department of Chemistry p. 43 5.74, Spring 2004: Introductory Quantum Mechanics II Instructor: Prof. Andrei Tokmakoff FERMI’S GOLDEN RULE We have calculated the probability of observing the system in a state k after applying a perturbation to A . Often we are interested in transition probability not to an individual eigenstate, but a distribution of eigenstates. Often the set of eigenstates form a continuum of accepting states, for instance, vibrational relaxation or ionization. Transfer to a set of continuum (or bath) states forms the basis for a describing irreversible relaxation. Qualitatively, you expect deterministic, oscillatory feedback between discrete quantum states. However, the amplitude of one discrete state coupled to a continuum will decay due to destructive interferences between the oscillating frequencies for each member of the continuum. So we are interested in calculating transition probability to a distribution of final states: P k . 2 P k = Probability of observing amplitude in discrete eigenstate of H 0 b k ρ E k () :
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This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course CHEM 5.74 taught by Professor Robertfield during the Spring '04 term at MIT.

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6 - p. 43 MIT Department of Chemistry 5.74, Spring 2004:...

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