PHYS_2014_Lecture_25 - Lecture 25 Review for Mid-term Exam...

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Fall 2010 Oklahoma State University PHYS2014: Benton Lecture 25, Slide 1 The class will be divided into three groups based on their recitation TA. Each group will take the exam in a different room as shown in the table below. Based on your recitation section, please go directly to your designated room. Lecture 25 Review for Mid-term Exam No. 3 16 November 2010, 5:30 - 7:00 pm Recitation Section TA Exam Room 1, 2, 3, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24 Ayon Patra PS-141 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 16, 17, 18, Ben Grossman PS-103 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 Razvan Stoian PS-110
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Fall 2010 Oklahoma State University PHYS2014: Benton Lecture 25, Slide 2 Exam will consist of 4 to 5 problems of similar form to those on the homework. The exam is designed so that it can be easily completed within 1 hour (but you will have 1.5 hours). Books, math tables, dictionaries, other written materials, and scratch paper are not permitted. Each student will be provided with a calculator to use during the exam. The calculator is to be returned when you hand in your exam. All work must be done directly on the exam paper provided (use back of paper if necessary). No make-up exams will be given. Regarding Midterm Exam No. 3
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Fall 2010 Oklahoma State University PHYS2014: Benton Lecture 25, Slide 3 Regarding Midterm Exam No. 3 Exam 3 will cover everything we’ve covered up through and including Homework Set No. 9. Emphasis will be on material in Homework Sets Nos. 7, 8, and 9. • Collisions Rotational Motion (moment of inertia, angular momentum, torque, rotational kinematics, etc.) Static Equilibrium Simple Harmonic Motion, including simple pendulums The exam will be of the same format and follow the same rules as Midterm Exam Nos. 1 & 2.
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Fall 2010 Oklahoma State University PHYS2014: Benton Lecture 25, Slide 4 v 1 = 400 m/s v 2 = 300 m/s m 2 =4.2 × 10 6 kg m 1 =7.7 × 10 6 kg θ ι =30 o An asteroid of mass m 1 = 7.7 × 10 6 kg is moving at a velocity of v 1 = 400 m/s. A second asteroid of mass m 2 = 4.2 × 10 6 kg is moving at v 2 = 300 m/s along a trajectory that makes a 30 ° angle relative to the first asteroid. The two asteroids are coated in copious quantities of cosmic slime such that when they collide they stick together. a) Find the velocity and angle at which the composite asteroid is traveling following the collision. b) Determine how much kinetic energy was lost in the collision.
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Fall 2010 Oklahoma State University PHYS2014: Benton Lecture 25, Slide 5 v 1 = 400 m/s v 2 = 300 m/s m 2 =4.2 × 10 6 kg m 1 =7.7 × 10 6 kg θ ι =30 o Solution: a) This is an inelastic problem in two dimensions. We need to use Conservation of Linear Momentum for each dimension. ( ) ( ) ( ) 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 cos cos sin sin f i f f i f f m v m v m m v m v m v m m v m v m m v θ θ θ θ + = + + = + = − + arrowrightnosp arrowrightnosp arrowrightnosp This gives us two equations which are what we need to find the two unknowns, v f and θ f . Now for some algebra.
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