PHYS_2014_Lecture_4

PHYS_2014_Lecture_4 - Lecture 4 2-D Kinematics Continued...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Fall 2010 Oklahoma State University PHYS2014: Benton Lecture 4, Slide 1 Example: I release a Billiard Ball and allow it to rool down an inclined track. • Friction (let’s neglect this for now). • Rotational Motion (largely eliminates friction). If θ = 20 ° and the distance between the track and the table is a maximum of 0.1 m, what is the velocity of the ball when it reaches the end of the track? 3 θ s a 0.1 m Lecture 4: 2-D Kinematics Continued
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fall 2010 Oklahoma State University PHYS2014: Benton Lecture 4, Slide 2 ? f v = a 3 θ s a 0.1 m What can we say about this problem? 1. It is a 2-D situation (so we’d like to break it up into two 1-D problems). 2. Acceleration in this problem is due to gravity (and is therefore constant). We can probably apply one (or more) of the four Kinematic Equations for problems with constant acceleration. 3. Gravity is not in the direction of motion . 4. The initial velocity, , is zero (ball starts from rest). s a 0 v a
Background image of page 2
Fall 2010 Oklahoma State University PHYS2014: Benton Lecture 4, Slide 3 3 θ s a ˆ sin g g i = p a ˆ cos g g j = − a x y We can simplify our problem by rotating our coordinate system by an angle so that the x -axis is parallel to the track and the y -axis is perpendicular to the track. This means that the final velocity,
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course PSYCH 2014 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Oklahoma State.

Page1 / 12

PHYS_2014_Lecture_4 - Lecture 4 2-D Kinematics Continued...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online