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3 Separation of A Solid Mixture

3 Separation of A Solid Mixture - Name “\Q’c’f‘qw...

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Unformatted text preview: - Name “\Q’c’f‘qw “olloni Section—0L___ EXPERIMENT 3 : SEPARATION OF A SOLID MIXTURE PRE-LABORATORY QUESTIONS 3 0......IUI.COO-.0000...0.......0.DO0.0.00.00.IIII....OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO The following preparatory questions should be answered before coming to lab. They are intended to introduce you to several ideas that are important to aspects of the experiment. You must turn in your work to your instructor before you will be allowed to begin the experiment. 1. What is the difference between a homogeneous and heterogeneous mixture? In the experiment, you are going to separate a solid mixture of salt, sand, and silt into individual components. nemmm mg diafinc‘r mission Warm Homoqemma Me» We. name campaigning-nan ngho.& a) Is this starting mixture homogeneous or heterogeneous? Hem—0W8, b) Classify the following mixtures as ‘heterogeneous’ or as a ‘homogeneous’ mixture. Pizza 93m” MEWS Blood L, DQM’K? mg g Air . W Banana Splits W 2. What is the difference between an element and a compound? Once separated, is each component of the solid mixture a pure element or a pure compound? PM etex’irxen’fl~ is ”comipoged 13$ (x siege mpg {35;— mot—Kim“ (Mignon; ifi’m a Giorgia men. (—3 Cmpwnd as made Up of". one, 0c more agth. Woe“ Wed QQC/‘fl CMpmea’V‘t 0% Q $o\id mixme B u ewe (gowngpné. Chem 1 4 l4—Academic Year 2010/201 1 3—1 3. Explain the difference between a physical property and a chemical property. What A, physical property will be'used to separate the components of the solid mixture? P‘Nsiwl evepmee «saw as otmad wifiwafi ch Wagfhg the identity 04? 6t éobs-mnce. 0h%\—fi\ccxl gsrgpefi-é 35 describe new CA fiomflfie ,chmnqes {mm a tmfiagfifit-fikg digfi'ee‘: azimmrge. Solubitifiry 4. Identify the following as a “mixture” or a “pure” substance. 1) tap water mi *3; g ' ii) bronze Mi x11 fl iii) lotion m3 1‘: 52: iV) sugar 9 AC: 5. The most appropriate and easy separation technique for getting “potable” water from /\ murky water is ‘ltration b) distillation c) crystallization d) solidification Cheml414-Academic Year 2010/2011 3.2 A Name “WWW Refining; RESULTS Section 601 PART ONE: THE SOLUBILITY IN WATER OF EACH SOLID COMPONENT { SOLID SOLUBLE INSOLUBLE SUSPENDS Salt 7K i Sand 7K ’ l Silt \ x PART TWO: DRAWING A FLOW CHART Solid Evaporate Water Salt, Sand and Silt Add water ”'Evaporate water Liquid Suspension A K Filter Solid Cheml414—Academic Year 2010/2011 A. Component A Component B Component C M“ 5‘” PART THREE : SEPARATION OF A SOLID MIXTURE Unknown number Mass of unknown Mass of evaporating dish Mass of filter pap_er Mass of watch glass 20.990 Mass of 50 mL beaker 101.616 Mass of evamrating dish and component A 23.990 Mass of filter paper, watch _gl_ass and component C 21.423 Mass of 50 mL beaker and Component B 29, C145 SIGN-OUT: All equipmentis put aWay, and the student bench is clean and dry. TA Date 4:) 52 [l 2 Z A CALCULATIONS PART THREE: SEPARATION OF A SOLID MIXTURE Mass of recovered salt C3. [27 9, Mass of recovered sand C5 .54 _ 5 Mass of recovered silt 011% g) % salt in unknown 0 ‘ ‘73 //5- moo = n \ ’o % sand in unknown 0 53 Amen -_ 517° % silt in unknown 0:13 g *le 6 _._ 17 .{a H3363 , z‘iflMug, emu” + B 23' (“05 em; d‘gh 1' ’0’ - 2%.3163 So am. canker - 2314¢E65 6%? 0““ fl” v ‘ . 0' \Z7 5 95} Seal": 0' 5405 Sand \ 2\ 1AZ‘5Q3 {SAW WW5 mach glaaeg «r C _ \.<563§ Que: amaze? ’ZOQ’S’EG‘b 100mb. g‘m‘é’é % C 20 . 0010;3 Neath glasfi W 01166 5x34: Cheml414—Academjc Year 2010/2011 ' 3flg Name Mtg-LEW Qfil‘afifi‘i‘fijfi Section fig} 1 A POST LABORATORY QUESTIONS 1. The unknown solid mixture you analyzed has only 1 correct composition. However, there will probably be a wide variation in the results obtained by different members of your class. Assuming that everyone had good experimental technique, how can you . . . 9 . ‘ account for this variation. (50me (533%. mig‘nfir not ”we W gmfiggwg‘i ewe/«ma. 2. a. Add up the individual masses of each of the solids that you recovered. Is this mass more or less than your original starting mass? \eee. ‘mg 9.103 b. Give a plausible source of error that can explain either your loss or gain in mass. 90 m6 0%: ,r-x 3., Starting with a solid mixture of the three substances (iodine, sugar and sulfur), draw a flow chart that depicts a plausible separation scheme based upon the following information: a. iodine is soluble in chloroform and soluble in carbon disulfide. WU ié‘ b. sulfur is insoluble in chloroform but soluble in carbon disulfidecaaagtaargigsz 0. sugar is insoluble in chloroform and carbon disulfide sotgd , 5011C} {arm {32%;};ng “" ”5390-1”, Static}. Sol-(Eur ‘ 1051113 mm (0. (am ’ ewe 601M.) ,»’-\ Cheml414-Academic Year 2010/2011 3—9 4. Repeat Question #3 but with the following information: a. iodine is insoluble in water but soluble in methanol b. sulfur is insoluble in water and in methanol c. sugar is soluble in water but insoluble in methanol 5. The massuof an empty beaker is 36.2 g. When a mixture of iron fillings, salt and sand is added, its mass increased to 39.8 g. Water is then added to the mixture and after thorough mixing, the aqueous layer is poured out into the sink. Upon drying of the residue (by gentle heating), the beaker with its contents weighed 37.5 g. (a) What is the concentration of salt in the original mixture? 33.53, 39,35 *fiWZ - .5 23a ., a 37 3 ~ ercsaaW 5.542% Mix, 23% . 3109, (b) How would you separate the iron fillings from the sand? W We 22% WWWWWW Chem1414-Academic Year 2010/2011 3_10 ...
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