SL-MorphParadox - The Paradox of SL Morphology Aranoff et...

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The Paradox of SL Morphology Aranoff et al. Presented by Meghan McCartney & Odalis Avant
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What is... ...simultaneous morphology? Morphemes are superimposed onto one another. Inflectional. Nonconcatenative ...sequential morphology? Morphemes are “strung together” (attach to base sign or root). Mainly derivational. Spoken languages are like this. More rare in signed languages.
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Morphological Structure in SLs Simultaneous Morphology Sequential Morphology Extensive use across SLs Alters path, direction, etc of a sign Productive Limited use Language-specific Signer-specific Related to grammaticization
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The Young Language Puzzle Researchers use young Creoles in their studies of SLs because both are relatively young. - Because of their age, Creoles have little inflectional and derivational morphology and no simultaneous morphology. - Instead, they rely on affixation, which varies from Creole to Creole. - In general, Creoles are not morphologically complex. The use of simultaneous morphology (which is complex) sets SLs apart from young Creoles.
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The Morphological-Typology Puzzle Unlike Creoles, signed languages have a simultaneous morphological system, which makes heavy use of complex inflectional morphemes such as verb agreement, etc. - The ASL sign for LOOK-AT might contain 5 morphemes for example, in “he looked at it with relaxation and enjoyment for a long time.” SLs like ASL and ISL also use some simple derivational affixes, which fall under the category of sequential morphology. - These seldom occur within the languages and can even vary from speaker to speaker.
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Critical Question (Q) Why do signed languages have two radically different types of morphologies? (A) Similarities to Creoles - Because SLs and Creoles were created under similar conditions and are considered young languages, we expect them to behave similarly.
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Critical Question (Q) Why do SLs have complex simultaneous morphology if they are comparable to young languages such as Creoles?
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